9-18 October 2020

INTERVIEW: Linda France, Murmuration

15 October 2020

14th October 2020

Interview conducted by Heather Craddock

 

Murmuration, a collaborative poem about the place of nature in coping with emergencies like the COVID-19 pandemic and climate change, was released as part of the 2020 Durham Book Festival. I spoke with poet Linda France, who curated Murmuration, to discuss the piece and her wider work this year as Climate Writer for New Writing North and Newcastle University.

  • Murmuration takes on the challenge of engaging with the vast issue of the climate crisis through hundreds of individual perspectives. In what ways do you find poetry to be an effective form for depicting the scale of climate change?

That’s an interesting question. On the face of it, poetry is a miniature form, dealing with detail, the particular, so it might not have the reach to convey the scale of climate change, a creature with many entangled tentacles. But poetry’s secret weapon is a depth charge into the emotions, a place of immense power and capacity to connect. Poetry embodies ‘less is more’. Highly compressed, working with silence and white space, everything it doesn’t say has the potential to ignite the reader’s imagination, which is a vast unquantifiable space.

  • How do you view the role of creative writing in the climate crisis?

One of the things creative writing can do is help us rise to the occasion. Dealing with the technical demands of grammar, syntax, focus, and style keeps our communication skills honed and helps remind us what really needs saying and what might be better left unsaid.  Taking a reader into account is a way of staying connected with others, remembering our common humanity.

From a wider cultural viewpoint, I think writers have an important contribution to make at this time, not least in offering a corrective to the slanted, superficial and divisive perspective created by the media. Neither simply a doomsayer or a cheerleader, a writer thinks longer, deeper, harder and their work will present different angles on climate justice and environmental challenges.

  • What do you hope contributors might feel when reading and watching Murmuration?

American poet Mary Oliver said “You catch more flies with honey than with vinegar” – I always wanted it to be a celebration of the natural word. People only protect what they love and I wanted the project to be a reminder of what we appreciate about the world, what we’re in danger of losing if we don’t take the necessary steps. I want everyone reading and watching Murmuration, whether they contributed any lines or not, to feel implicated, part of something bigger than themselves alone, and for the work to be open enough that they can find their own ‘story’ in it, make a personal, as well as a shared connection.

  • Do you consider the final piece to be primarily a celebration or a warning about human relationships with nature?

I don’t think you can separate the two – isn’t that the point of the crisis we find ourselves in?  We celebrate it because we know the dangers, the risk of losing it. There’s no room any more for nature as simply a recreational activity, solely for the enjoyment of human beings. We are nature too and there’s nowhere else to go, as one of the lines in the poem says, nowhere else to escape to, no ‘away’ where we can throw our rubbish. What happens on the farthest side of the world affects us all.

  • Did the experience of curating the hundreds of contributions to Murmuration reshape your own perspective on climate change and the current global health crisis?

I felt very touched reading all the ways people appreciate the natural world – most of which I resonate with. Stepping inside all the lines was like looking up at a spinning mirror ball – magical, exciting. So, even though it was a challenge to make the poem, distilling 11,296 words down to 1000 (with only a couple of handfuls of my own used as glue), I felt energised and encouraged by the response. I think people’s contributions and the poem and film we made together encapsulates a lot of real active hope for the future, intense and meaningful care and concern. This is the sort of momentum that makes change happen.

My Climate Residency is just about to come to an end but I’m very aware there’s still loads more that needs to be done so I’m looking to extend it. Murmuration has shown what is possible when lots of us flock together and I’d really like the chance to explore new ways of doing that harnessing the power of the word.

Watch Murmuration here.

This work was produced by participants on our Durham Book Festival Reviewers in Residence programme, a cultural journalism programme run by New Writing North Young Writers. Reviewers in Residence gives aspiring journalists aged 15-23 the chance to review books, attend events and interview authors at the Durham Book Festival. For more information about New Writing North Young Writers visit the New Writing North website.

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